Food for thought in the kitchen

In the final part of an occasional series about mindfulness, we head to the kitchen for immersive therapy

The kitchen is the most important social room in your house, and the best place to encourage friends and family to open up and talk it through.

Whatever the issues, talking is good. Really good. And it’s amazing the number of people who have been there, understand and genuinely do care about you. So invite friends around, cook food together, share dinner, share problems. Share some wine, but not too much, and cut out the caffeine after 3pm. That includes, tea, coffee, hot chocolate, coke and other fizzy drinks. There are plenty of wonderful herbal drinks and teas around now.

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Make your kitchen a focal social point in your home. Eat with the family around the table (in the kitchen or dining room) rather than with a tray in front of the TV. That’s how the Italians do it, and they understand the value of family dynamics and talking through problems.

Acknowledge what’s happening in your life and take little steps which can lead to big and positive changes. I’ve been on a journey that’s brought me to this point, a life event that has actually unlocked me. I feel I know myself so much better, accept my boundaries, know when I need to step back, make changes and where I want to head next in my life journey.

There are many ways of dealing with and treating the symptoms of anxiety, cares and worries, both naturally and with medication and you have to open your mind and find what works best for you. If there is one word I can sum all this up with, it’s ‘immersive’. Be immersive. I think it’s a better descriptive word than mindfulness.

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Loving life in the kitchen with mug (above) , apron and tea towel from Alison’s Love District range

 

 

Loving life in the kitchen with mug (above) , apron and tea towel from Alison’s Love District range

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Five top tips to beat dark thoughts

“A great cause of the night is lack of the sun….”*

Our latest in the series of mindfulness offers Five Top Tips to beat dark thoughts….

1: Relaxing with candles, gentle music and soaking in a warm bath with Epsom salts can help to draw out toxins through the pores and aid a good night’s sleep. It can also help to dispel dark thoughts. The bathroom here is a Fidget design at the Cedar Manor Hotel 

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2: Have an adventure. A change is as good as a rest. Go away somewhere, maybe just for a weekend or a month or more. It doesn’t matter. What matters is that you are taking yourself out of your normal environment and you are totally immersed in exploring somewhere new. If money is tight, stay with family or friends and maybe even reconnect with old pals. Adventures can be small ones, you don’t have to climb every mountain.

3: Become a dancing queen or king. Even just watching that sequence will lift the spirits. It’s fun, enjoyable and exercise. You could take up classes in salsa or tango, or just dance around the kitchen while cooking dinner.

4: Try writing it out of your system. I tried a creative writing workshop for the first time, and the different ways in which we applied each exercise proved to be excellent at focusing the mind and making me think in a different way. The quality and creativity that I produced at just a one-day day workshop was amazing. And follow the most inspiring wordsmith @RobGMacfarlane on Twitter for his word of the day

5: But do seek help if things are getting too much. If you have never had depressive symptoms before, you don’t necessarily understand what’s going on. If you feel overwhelmed, helpless, despair, can’t think straight, can’t make decisions, can’t be bothered, feel anti-social, tearful, think introspectively a lot and feel low, then you should go and talk to your GP.

*Shakespeare: As You Like It

 

 

 

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